Category Archives: DuPont™ Vespel® CR-6100 Solutions

Vespel® CR-6100 has been used for a wide variety of rotating equipment wear components. Boulden Can help you with your Vespel® needs!

Use DuPont™ Vespel® CR-6100 to make hydrofluoric acid pumps last longer

Hydrofluoric acid—also known as HF acid or hydrogen fluoride—is a strong acid found in some refinery alkylation processes along with specialized chemical processes. DuPont™ Vespel® CR-6100 can help hydrofluoric acid pumps last longer.

Limitations of traditional materials

Traditionally, pump wear parts in hydrofluoric acid pumps are made from Monel, which is very good for corrosion resistance. The downside of this arrangement is that both rotating and stationary wear components need to be made from Monel, requiring large clearances at the wear rings to avoid pump seizure. These large clearances compromise the mechanical seal life, exposing the seal to higher vibration and larger shaft deflections.

Hydrofluoric acid also tends to form crystalline deposits. Several plants using hydrofluoric acid have reported pumps being seized due to crystalline deposits accumulating while the pump is in stand-by, ultimately eliminating the clearance at the wear rings. When Operations tries to switch to the spare pump, it proves to be unavailable.

Wear rings made from Dupont CR-6100

Upgrading stationary Monel Rings To Composite Materials

The way to upgrade your hydrofluoric acid pumps is to install DuPont™ Vespel® CR-6100 stationary wear rings and continue using Monel rotating rings. This small change essentially eliminates the risk of seizure between Monel parts and allows tighter clearances at the wear rings.

Vespel® CR-6100 is a composite material made from oriented carbon fibers and Teflon® PFA resin, resulting in broad chemical resistance combined, excellent dimensional stability, and a temperature range from cryogenic to 260⁰C (500⁰F). Vespel® CR-6100 has been used in a wide range of hydrofluoric acid services for more than 10 years with excellent results.

Because Vespel® CR-6100 is non-seizing, wear ring and bushing clearances can be reduced to 50% of the API minimum values for metal rings. The reduced clearance increases the hydraulic forces which stabilize the pump rotor. With a more stable rotor, shaft deflection is reduced, vibration is reduced, and seals and bearings will last longer. Furthermore, even if crystalline deposits build up when the pump is in stand-by, it is unlikely they will cause the pump to seize at start up.

The end result of this upgrade is greater reliability and availability. Life cycle costs will be lower with fewer repairs and avoiding seizures of the Monel parts. Contact Boulden today to learn more about Vespel® CR-6100 and Boulden’s B-Series composite materials.

 

The Final Installation Steps: Length and Clearance

Upgrading pumps with composite wear componentsSetting the final dimensions of your DuPont™ Vespel CR-6100 component

Review

We have discussed how to measure your pump, prepare the metal parts, and establish the press fit for your Vespel® CR-6100 installation. The final two dimensions you need to establish are the part length and the clearance.

The Part Length

Vespel® CR-6100 has an extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion in the radial plane (perpendicular to rotation). This is one of the principal reasons it performs so well in centrifugal pump components. The low coefficient of thermal expansion is achieved through the use of radially-oriented, long carbon fibers.

Conversely, the coefficient of thermal expansion along the axis is relatively high. Therefore, the part length for a Vespel® CR-6100 component should account for the axial thermal expansion at operating temperature. Table 4 of our installation guide provides the details on how to make this adjustment.

Table 4 of our installation guide provides the details on how to make this adjustment.

The Clearance

The clearance for the part is set depending on the diameter and component type. Tables 2a and 2b in the installation guide show the clearance recommendations for horizontal pump components such as pump wear rings, throttle bushings, center bushings, inter-stage rings, balance bushings, and throat bushings.

Tables 2a and 2b provide recommended minimum clearance for horizontal pump components.

Tables 3a and 3b show the clearance recommendations for vertical pump components like vertical pump shaft bearings, wear rings, and throat bushings.

Tables 3a and 3b provide recommended minimum clearances for vertically suspended pump parts.

The best way to set the clearance is to press the component into place, and then final machine the bore to the desired clearance. This is shown in steps 5a-7a in our installation guide, pages 8-9.

Where final machining after the press fit is not practical, you can design the component to have the correct clearance after the press fit. For most component geometries, you can assume the Vespel® CR-6100 will reduce at a 1:1 ratio with the press fit. This method is shown in steps 5b-7b in our installation guide, page 9.

Some sites have implemented a hybrid method. They measure the inside diameter of the Vespel® CR-6100 case wear ring after installation, and then machine the metal impeller wear ring to set the desired clearance.

Conclusions

Installing Vespel® CR-6100 is an easy upgrade to make your pumps more reliable, safe, and efficient. Follow the steps in our installation guide and you can make your pump even better than the day it was new. If you need material, Boulden carries inventory of stock sizes in the USA, Europe, and Singapore.

Until next time, please feel free to contact Boulden with your application details or to request a quote. We’ll be happy to answer any questions you might have.

 

Helpful Links:

Standard Stock Sizes of Vespel® CR-6100

Vespel® CR-6100 Product Data Sheet

Pump Improvements

Today’s Photo

Rock of Gibraltar – was one of the Pillars of Hercules and was known to the Romans as Mons Calpe.

 

Contact Us Today To Learn More About Vespel and Boulden Company!

Reduce Shaft Deflection by Upgrading Your Wear Rings

Upgrading Wear Rings to Composite Materials Reduces Shaft Deflection

The shaft deflection in your pump directly affects mechanical seal reliability. Reducing wear ring clearance is an easy upgrade to minimize shaft deflection.

Consider the faces of your mechanical seals–lapped flat to within one or two light bands of flatness, designed to run with precise alignment and minimal leakage across the faces. Excessive shaft deflection at the seal prevents proper alignment of the faces, potentially allows particles between the faces, and can lead to higher leakage and faster wear of critical components.

Reducing the clearance at your pump wear rings will help reduce shaft deflection and improve your seal life.

What does API say?

API 610 11th Edition (section 6.9.1.3) states: To obtain satisfactory seal performance, the shaft stiffness shall limit the total deflection under the most severe dynamic conditions over the allowable operating range of the pump with maximum diameter impeller(s) and the specific speed and liquid to 50 μm (0.002 in) at the primary seal faces.

The same section goes on to state the variables pump designers can manipulate in order to achieve this target:

  • Shaft diameter
  • Shaft span between bearings or shaft overhang
  • Casing design including dual volutes or diffusers

Finally, there is a provision for the wear rings: For one- and two-stage pumps, no credit shall be taken for the liquid stiffening effects of impeller wear rings. For multistage pumps, liquid stiffening effects shall be considered and calculations performed at both one and two times the nominal design clearances. 

Why does wear ring clearance matter?

That last phrase highlights a major role of pump wear rings. Why does the standard insist that the designer calculate the stiffness effects at one and two times clearance?

The reason is the Lomakin Effect–the bearing effect generated by the differential pressure across the wear rings and throttle bushings in your pumps. The stiffness from the Lomakin Effect is inversely proportional to clearance. If your wear ring clearance doubles, you lose half the stiffness generated by the wear rings.

Conversely, if you use non-seizing composite wear rings from materials like DuPont™ Vespel CR-6100, you can reduce the clearance by up to 50% and double the stiffness generated by the wear rings. Increased stiffness from the wear rings helps to reduce shaft deflection. Field results have shown that pumps running with reduced clearance exhibit lower vibration and fewer seal leaks.

New Pumps Only

It is important to note that the current API standard applies to new pumps. For pumps which already exist in your plant, upgrading the pump wear rings and reducing clearance is an easy upgrade; whereas, there is little you can do to modify the design of the shaft or volute without a major pump upgrade or replacement.

This is particularly important because the refineries in North America and Europe (along with older plants around the world) continue to operate large populations of pumps from the 60’s 70’s and 80’s. One- and two-stage pumps built during that period frequently have long, thin shafts which suffer from excessive shaft deflection. Multi-stage pumps, including those built to the current standard, also have flexible shafts and rely upon the wear rings to limit shaft deflection.

Upgrading older and multi-stage pumps with Vespel CR-6100 wear rings and reducing the clearance is one of the fastest and easiest ways to improve the reliability of these older pumps. The upgrade will also produce a significant increase in pump efficiency.

Conclusion

Reducing wear ring clearance will help reduce the shaft deflection in your pumps and help improve your mechanical seal performance. Vespel CR-6100 has proven reliable in a wide range of services from cryogenic to 260 C (500 F) in thousands of applications around the world.

Contact Boulden today with your application details, and we can discuss whether Vespel CR-6100 or Boulden B-Series is a good fit for your pump. We have a huge inventory of stock sizes available for immediate delivery almost anywhere in the world.

For application and installation details, download the Boulden Installation Guide for Vespel CR-6100.

Case Study: Upgrade Your Pumps for Reduced Steam Consumption

A major unit at a petrochemical facility in Asia recently upgraded a Byron Jackson boiler feed pump with Vespel® CR-6100 non-metallic wear rings. This pump is driven by a single stage steam turbine. The objective of the upgrade was to reduce steam consumption.

The case wear rings in the 9 stage pump were upgraded to Vespel® CR-6100 , along with the center and throttle bushings. Using the non-metallic composite Vespel® CR-6100 allowed a reduction in the wear ring clearance. All components were fabricated with the Boulden PERF-Seal® design, which helps the pump achieve higher efficiency and improved stability compared to conventional smooth bore wear rings.

Benefits of Updating Case Wear Rings to Composite Materials

After the upgrade, plant personnel measured steam consumption assuming the same pump operating conditions as before the upgrade. The results were the following:

  • Total efficiency improvement of nearly 5%.
  • As the customer operates pump for 140 days per year, steam savings are $26,000 per year.
  • Radial vibration after the upgrade was significantly reduced by nearly 50%.

Because of the success of this upgrade project, the site is considering upgrading many more high-energy pumps with Vespel® CR-6100 and the PERF-Seal® design.

Vespel® CR-6100 case wear rings in a 9 stage pump

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Higher efficiency and lower vibration are typical benefits of an upgrade to Vespel® CR-6100 and the PERF-Seal® design.

If you have a high energy pump, whether a charge pump, boiler feed water pump, or product shipping pump, consider upgrading the wear components during your next repair. You can save a ton of money and make the pump run better. Contact Boulden to discuss your application. If you have a pump currently in your shop or arriving soon, we have the material you need in stock and can deliver what you need quickly.

Get Rid of Flare Knockout Drum Pump Problems with DuPont™ Vespel® CR-6100

If you would like to improve the reliability of your flare knockout drum pumps, consider an upgrade to DuPont™ Vespel® CR-6100 wear rings and bushings.

In a distant corner of every hydrocarbon processing plant there is a flare (or several flares). The flare burns off excess hydrocarbon gas  leakage from the plant. The flare gas comes from all of the emergency relief lines in the plant along with the refinery blow-down system which handles the normal leakage from tandem seals and numerous other points in the plant. All of these lines join into a header which flows into a large vessel called the Flare Knockout Drum.

The fluid in the header is a mixture of liquid and gas. The job of the flare knockout drum is to separate the gas from the liquid. The gas goes on to be burned in the flare. The liquid is returned to the processing plant with the Flare Knockout Drum Pump.

Flare Knockout Drum Pump Challenges

For many plants, this pump causes headaches. It operates on a level switch, stopping and starting. It is located in a remote area of the plant and receives limited attention. The process liquid can be a mixture of just about anything from the plant–sometimes corrosive and generally filled with flashing light hydrocarbons. It is a tough service.

Vespel® CR-6100 works very well in Flare Knockout Drum service

A few years ago, a long-term case study was published showing the reliability improvements at a refinery which had upgraded dozens of bad actor pumps to Vespel® CR-6100. Two of the pumps upgraded were flare knockout drum pumps. In this case, the pumps were 4-stage, centrifugal, vertical-canned pumps, shown in photo 1. Before the conversion to Vespel® CR-6100, these pumps would rarely run for 2 years without a failure—seal failures and pump seizure were the two common failure modes.

In late 2004 and early 2005, both pumps were converted to Vespel® CR-6100. From the date of upgrade, both pumps ran without failure through the end of 2009. The combined MTBR for the service went from 15 months in the prior 5 years to 122 months after conversion to Vespel® CR-6100. In more practical terms, in the 5 years before Vespel® CR-6100 was installed, there were 8 repairs to these pumps; in the 5 years after Vespel® CR-6100 was installed, there were 0 repairs to these pumps.

The pumps in this service went from being a chronic headache to a silent and reliable part of the flare system. Contact Boulden today to upgrade your pump components to Boulden B-Series composite material or Metcar carbon graphite materials.

Diesel Charge Pump Case Study

DuPont™ Vespel® CR-6100 helps the pump survive and keep pumping.

The Diesel Charge Pump

A refinery in North America experienced recurring issues with their diesel charge pumps. The pumps provide feed into the refinery HDS unit. Loss of feed to the unit can result in reduced refinery production and significant losses.

The refinery has 3 total pumps in this service–two pumps running in parallel with an installed spare. The pumps are 1200 HP (900 kW), 13-stage, axially-split, between-bearings pumps (API Type BB3), running at 3550 RPM. The product is diesel fuel at approximately 250 F (120 C).

The original design of these pumps included metal wear rings, throttle, and center bushings. During the previous process upsets, these metal wear parts had seized, requiring expensive pump overhauls. The overhauls required the services of an outside shop, exposing the refinery to production risk due to operating without a spare pump for several weeks.

 

Vespel® CR-6100 is Put to the Test

Earlier this year, the refinery upgraded the first of the three charge pumps to Vespel® CR-6100, using Boulden’s patented PERF-Seal design for all of the stationary wear parts. The rotating wear parts remained metal, using the original metallurgy and surface finish.

Soon after the upgrade, a process upset caused a temporary loss of flow to the pumps. Figure 1 shows the process flow data during the upset condition. Each box along the x-axis represents one hour and the y-axis represents flow rate. Without sufficient flow to the pumps (blue and cyan lines), minimum flow (yellow line) could not be immediately established, causing the pumps to run at extremely low flow rates for nearly an hour. Partial flow was re-established, but the pumps continued to operate far below the design flow rate for nearly 4 more hours.

Figure 1: Process flow data for the diesel charge pumps during the process upset

 

Normal process conditions were finally restored, the pumps were individually shut down for inspection. The pump with metal wear components seized upon shut down had damage to both bearings and required significant repair work.

The pump with Vespel® CR-6100 rotated freely, with the inspection revealing some damage to the thrust bearing. The thrust bearing was replaced in the field and the pump returned to service where it ran at full rate with no evidence of reduced performance or vibration issues.

Conclusion

In an ideal world, plant processes always operate per design. Unfortunately, there are times when things do not go as planned. When that happened to this refinery, the diesel charge pump with Vespel® CR-6100 survived where the pumps with metal components could not.

Beyond surviving this incident, the refinery also reports that the pump is running with lower vibration than the pumps with metal components. With reduced clearance at the wear parts, the pump is almost certainly consuming less power, further reducing the life cycle cost of the pump.

If you have a service causing any issues at your plant, contact Boulden today. We have Vespel® CR-6100 in stock in a wide range of sizes in the USA, Europe, and Singapore and we can assist with any application or design questions you have. If you know what you need, just request a quote. Until next time, be safe.

Helpful Links:

Standard Stock Sizes of Vespel® CR-6100

3MW Boiler Feed Pump Case Study
Today’s Photo

October in the forest, Mullerthal, Luxembourg

 

Case Study: Repeat Failures of Boiler Feed Water Pumps

Vespel®CR-6100 centrifugal pump components

Boiler Feed Pump Seizing Problems

The low lubricity of boiler feed water along with operational challenges can lead to pump seizures. How do you avoid the problem? Or, if it happens, what is the best way to solve the problem? This case study is about repeat seizures of two, new, 1.2 MW boiler feed water pumps operating in a refinery. The pumps were fitted with metal wear parts, ran at 2980 rpm, and experienced failures immediately after commissioning.

The Tale of the Terrible Boiler Feed Pumps

Here is a brief summary of the problems this site faced with their boiler feed pumps:
  1. The first failure was due to pump seizure, the original failure analysis suggested the pumps failed due to sand or debris lodging into the close clearance between rotating and stationary wear parts. The filters on the suction strainer were changed to a finer mesh to limit particle size which could enter the pump.
  2. Soon after, one of the pumps seized again–this time, the metal parts had galled before start up and the pump could not be rotated by hand. The clearances at the wear rings, center bushing, and throttle bushing were increased.
  3. The pumps seized again.
  4. Repeated start-up attempts against seized pumps had also damaged the pump motors.

The failure analysis led the engineers to re-check the entire design and installation of thepumps:

  • Re-checking the design basis of the pumps
  • Re-checking the materials of construction
  • Re-checking assembly and rotor run-out
  • Re-balancing the rotor
  • Performing a new pump rotordynamic analysis
  • Verifying soundness of foundation and that pipe strain within limits
  • Evaluation of operational practices and function of the minimum control valve

Minimum Flow Valve Problem

Ultimately, the site realized the minimum flow valve was not functioning properly, leading to low flow rates at start up. The low flow rates caused localized flashing inside the pump and the metal parts would seize.

Their corrective action was to change the minimum flow valve, increase the clearance at the center bushing, throttle bushing, and wear rings, and “upgrade” to a “non-seizing” metal alloy. Because they increased the clearance at all of the internal parts, they ran a new rotor dynamic analysis to verify that the rotor would remain stable.

How Much Did It Cost?

Between repeated pump repairs, motor overhauls, engineering resources to troubleshoot and re-verify the design, the problem undoubtedly cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. If start up was delayed or the site lost production, the losses were probably in the millions.
The solution was also extremely expensive. The clearance at the pump wear parts was permanently increased. We’ll generously assume the increased clearance resulted in a 2% efficiency loss. Assuming a power price of $0.12/kw-hr, this loss of efficiency will cost about $50,000/year. Over the life of the pumps, the site will lose another million dollars or more!

Avoid Pump Seizure By Using Vespel® CR-6100

If the site had specified Vespel® CR-6100 wear parts when the pump was ordered, the pump would not have seized. Most likely, the pumps would have made it through the low flow transients without issue and all of the efforts above could have been avoided. The motors would not have been damaged, and they would not have had to increase the internal clearances. Even after the first seizure occurred, they could have easily converted to Vespel® CR-6100 and saved time, effort, and cost. The small adder to specify Vespel® CR-6100 would have saved several hundred thousand dollars at a minimum.

Furthermore, because Vespel® CR-6100 does not seize, clearance at the wear rings, center bushing, and throttle bushing could have been reduced, resulting in an efficiency gain instead of an efficiency loss. So, instead of losing $50,000 per year in operating costs, the site could have saved at least $50,000 per year–a net $100,000 annual savings from using Vespel® CR-6100. Combined with the Boulden PERF-Seal® design, the pump would be more reliable, easier to operate, and more efficient than a pump with metal parts and increased clearance.

Conclusion

If you are buying or overhauling a boiler feed water pump, specify Vespel®CR-6100 for all of the stationary wear parts (the rotating parts will remain metal). You’ll have a better pump that is easier to operate with a lower life cycle cost due to higher efficiency. If you have an existing pump that seizes, contact Boulden today. We can help you solve this problem in just about any pump service.

If you simply have an urgent repair and need a great material fast, we have a large inventory of material in stock and can supply raw material or machined parts with very short lead times. If you have dimensions, quantities, and basic service conditions, simply request a quote. We’re here to help you!

Case Study: Upgrade of Boiler Feed Water Pumps

Last week, we wrote about a boiler feed pump case history where the customer paid dearly because they didn’t use Vespel® CR-6100. Repeated failures due to pump seizure led them to increase the clearance at the wear rings, resulting in a lifetime of lower efficiency and higher operating costs.
Published right next to that unfortunate history was another boiler feed case study where the site and the shop involved took a set of 50-year-old boiler feed pumps and made them run better than when they were new. Unlike the first case history, they used Vespel® CR-6100.

The 50-Year-Old Pumps

The boiler feed pumps were originally installed in 1970 with 1.1MW electric motors. They are 8-stage BB5 pumps with 80 bar (1200 psi) differential pressure. Over many years of wear, erosion, and mechanical seal failures, the pumps needed to be overhauled.
The internal wear components were found to be running with clearance more than double the API design values for metal wear parts. The excessive clearance at the balance drum created high-velocity flow and erosion at the pump discharge cover. The seal design was outdated and the seal flush design was not correct. Some of the old pump components had very poor concentricity.

What They Did

The pump internals were repaired as needed. Obsolete parts were re-engineered and restored to good concentricity. The seal was updated and flush plan was corrected.
For the wear components, Vespel® CR-6100 wear rings, inter-stage rings, and balance drum bushing were installed with the patented Boulden PERF-Seal® design. Clearance at the wear components was reduced to approximately 50% of the API minimum values for metal parts. To save time and money in the shop, the existing metal wear components were re-machined and used as holders for the Vespel® CR-6100 components.

Results

Compared to the worn out condition, the pumps gained 15% efficiency after the overhaul. Depending on the local power price, this represents $100,000–$150,000 per year in lower operating costs.
Compared to the original design curve, the pump is 4% more efficient than when it was new, representing $30,000-$40,000 of lower operating costs. Maintaining this efficiency in the coming years will result in hundreds of thousands of dollars of savings.

Conclusion

If you are buying or overhauling a boiler feed water pump, specify Vespel®CR-6100 for all of the stationary wear parts (the rotating parts will remain metal). You’ll have a better pump that is easier to operate with a lower life cycle cost due to higher efficiency. If you have any pump where you are looking to increase efficiency, contact Boulden today. We can help you increase pump efficiency in most pumping services.
If you have an urgent repair and need a great material fast, we have a large inventory of material in stock and can supply raw material or machined parts with very short lead times. If you have dimensions, quantities, and basic service conditions, simply request a quote. We are here to help you.
Until next time, stay safe and healthy. And don’t use metal parts in your boiler feed water pumps.
Boiler Feed Water pump upgraded with Vespel® CR-6100 componenets

BB5 boiler feed water pump upgraded to Vespel® CR-6100 with the PERF-Seal® design for the wear parts

A Look at Life Cycle Costs – Part 3: Unplanned Events

Typical Life-Cycle Cost For A Pump System Infographic

Typical Life-Cycle Cost For A Pump System

Today we take a final look at the above graph. We have already looked at Energy and Maintenance costs. Today we look at Operating, Environmental, and Downtime Costs.

When you upgrade pumps with composite materials like Vespel® CR-6100, Boulden B-Series, or Metcar® composites, you eliminate the metal-to-metal contact points in the pump, which essentially eliminates the risk of pump seizure. The pump is far more likely to survive running dry at start-up or during off-design events.

Benefits of Upgrading Pumps With Composite Materials

These are hidden bonuses to upgrading your pumps with composite materials. High quality composite materials act like a safety net in your pump, and sometimes, the savings from this benefit pay for all of the composite upgrades your company will ever do. Consider the following case studies:

Case Study: Condensate Return Pumps

Many years ago, a refinery upgraded the vertical pump shaft bearings in one of their 3 condensate return pumps to Vespel® CR-6100. The other two pumps had their original bronze bearings. The pumps were located in the hot well of a condensing steam turbine. The turbine was driving a critical compressor in one of the refinery process units.

Something happened which changed the pressure in the hot well and the pumps started operating in a vacuum intermittently for 9 hours. The two pumps with bronze bushings seized and had to be removed from service. The pump with Vespel® CR-6100 survived and allowed the process unit to continue operating. An upgrade which cost about $2000 likely saved the refinery millions.

Case Study: Potassium Carbonate Pumps

Plant operators heard a loud noise coming from a hot potassium carbonate pump. They were concerned because if potassium carbonate is released into the atmosphere, it creates a respiratory hazard. They shut down the pump and switched to the spare.

When the pump arrived in the shop, they found a piece of metal had broken from a valve and lodged in the pump impeller. Fortunately, during the previous repair, the maintenance shop had upgraded the pump to Vespel® CR-6100 case rings. During the incident, the pump did not seize, the seals didn’t leak, and a potentially major incident was likely avoided. A $3000 upgrade to the wear rings likely saved hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Case Study: Hydrocracker Charge Pump

Improved efficiency can also translate into increased production. A refinery upgraded their 9-stage hydrocracker charge pump, operating at 6400 rpm to Vespel® CR-6100 wear rings with reduced clearance. This $25,000 upgrade increased unit throughput by 4% creating millions of additional revenue for the refinery over the life of the installation.

Pump Impeller with Vespel CR-6100 wear rings

Conclusion

Upgrading your pumps to composite materials reduces pump life cycle costs by making your pumps safer, easier to operate, more reliable and more efficient. When unexpected events occur or where you can increase throughput, a single installation can save you millions of dollars.

Take a look at the pumps coming into your workshop. Use the repair as an opportunity to make the pump better by upgrading to composite wear parts. Boulden has the material you need in stock and can deliver raw material or machined parts with very short lead times. Get in touch with us today!

A Look at Pump Life Cycle Costs – Part 2: Energy Savings

 

Typical Life-Cycle Cost For A Pump System Infographic

Typical Life-Cycle Cost For A Pump System

Today we continue our look at the above graph. Last week we looked at maintenance costs. Today, we look at energy consumption.

When you upgrade pumps with composite materials like Vespel® CR-6100, Boulden B-Series, or Metcar® composites, you can reduce the energy consumption. Reducing the energy consumption of the pump creates continuous and long lasting savings.

Higher Pump Efficiency = Energy Savings

Composite materials reduce the operating cost of a pump through increased efficiency. Because composite materials do not seize, the clearance at the main wear parts – wear rings, throttle bushings, center bushings, balance drums–can be reduced. These parts separate areas of high pressure and low pressure within the pump and reducing the clearance reduces the internal recirculation across these parts.

The target for this upgrade should be the higher power pumps in the plant, as the payout tends to increase with pump power. Multi-stage horizontal pumps tend to offer the best return on investment because they produce high pressure and the recirculation across many internal components has a significant impact on pump efficiency.

Average Energy Savings Of A Pump Running Full Time

Over the years, many boiler feed pumps, charge pumps, and product shipping pumps have been upgraded to Vespel® CR-6100. It is typical for the efficiency gain from reducing clearance in these pumps to fall within the range of 3-5% compared to the “as new” condition of the pump. So, if you have a 1000 HP (750 kW) pump running full time, the energy savings will likely be in the range of $20,000 – $30,000 per year. If we assume an 8 year run at higher efficiency, savings will accumulate to around $200,000.

Conclusion – Using High-Quality Composite Materials Help With Energy Savings 

In short, using quality composite materials like Vespel® CR-6100 with reduced clearance in your high energy pumps will pay for itself quite easily on energy savings alone. Next month, we’ll discuss some special situations where you can save even more money.

Until then, whatever the temperature, chemical, or operating conditions for your pump, it is likely that Boulden has a non-seizing, non-galling composite material to help you improve your pump efficiency and reliability. Boulden has a large inventory of material in stock and we can supply raw material or finished parts with very short lead times. We can provide all of the technical support required for you to make the upgrade a success.

Contact us today and use your next repair as an opportunity to upgrade your pump.